Ode to water changes

Discussion in 'General Discussions' started by Nina_W, Feb 22, 2021.

  1. fux940510

    fux940510

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2019
    Messages:
    465
    Likes Received:
    441
    Location:
    Muldersdrift
    I would definitely see about doing something for your substrate. It looks pretty deep in some areas, so there might be a build up of mulm, especially below the decoration. Only issue would then be if the nitrates are coming from the tap. If there are nitrates coming from the tap, i'd setup a barrel or bin to hold water and get some floating plants or pothos to try and pull those nitrates out.
     
    Nina_W likes this.
  2. Guest




  3. Beachless

    Beachless

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2018
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Gauteng
    @Hlompho Lion take some water in a bag to a good local pet store and ask them to test it for you before you do anything drastic. That tank doesn't look like it has had 100ppm + for months on end. Sometimes the test kits are faulty.
     
    Nina_W likes this.
  4. BoelderBeestie

    BoelderBeestie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,062
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Morning @Nina_W

    Our discussion yesterday got me thinking. When there was the drought, I had to stretch my water as far as possible and used my TDS pen to check the climb. Now what would I have done if my source water was fluctuating rapidly like yours from week to week and I couldn't run my RO unit anymore to get my water how I like it because of the heavy fines.

    I would have had to skip testing the source water and only test the tanks after a water change to get a baseline and then monitor the climb from there, and do it again with every wc. That would have worked alright I guess.

    The reason I'm using the pen rather than a NO3 test is the amount of tanks I have and that it takes hours (I did it once and then thought nope there must be a faster way) to test everything proper with liquid and above that, I have to maintain a very high water quality for my youngsters (NO3 under 10ppm, closer to 0 the better) so needed to have a test of some sort to check the water quality.

    I like what you said about "in practice". So I will only know how well it works for me after I've been put into that situation and did the practical work, as most things look good on paper but once you get going it's different than expected.

    ----------------

    As for my water changes, I'll use my adult tank as an example. It's a 1200L recirculating system with two tanks connected, a 1.8m and 1.5m, filter is a dual 200L barrel wet\dry trickle filter it holds 250L of water, media is 25kg of ceramic\matrix mix. Stocking is 100L per fish. I do a feces vac daily, after 3 days I do a 100L top up. On weekends I do a bigger wc to compensate for the No3 build up like you explained in the OP, the size of this wc depends on water quality. Its between 40-70%, depending how heavy my hand was with feedings.
     
    A new day and Nina_W like this.
  5. OP
    Nina_W

    Nina_W

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    140
    Location:
    Midrand, Gauteng
    Thanks, that's interesting - I used to just bite the bullet and test each tank, but you're right, it takes ages. With only the one now, and it being an "easy keeper" in the sense that dechlorinated tap water is perfect for WC, I really have no push to streamline my own process - though the TDS meter is much easier than the darn NO3 tests (shakeshakeshakeshakeshakeshakeshakeshake...shakeshakeshakeshake...shakeshakehsake... hehe).

    Part of this discussion, that goes beyond my original post, is that water changes also dilutes hormones that fish produce that also build up, and can also inhibit growth - I wonder if these are big enough particles that a TDS meter would pick them up. Do you know? Otherwise I'll get me to reading. In bigger aquariums with regular, over 50% WCs, this won't be an issue, but in heavily stocked, or in low-WC frequency planted tanks, this may well become a thing.
     
    A new day likes this.
  6. BoelderBeestie

    BoelderBeestie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,062
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Yes it measures both organic and inorganic ions.

    Hahaha, tell me about it. I'm sure the rapid pace of technological development will give us good affordable meters that measure everything we need to know in the near future. They exist but the price is one of those that you need to sit down before you read it. Last time I checked it was R25000 for a hand held industrial meter that they use in chemical plants that measures everything we need a reading on. You name it and that thing could read it. You must see the probe, the thing looks like a vodacom tower with all the electrodes hahaha.
     
    A new day likes this.
  7. OP
    Nina_W

    Nina_W

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    140
    Location:
    Midrand, Gauteng
    Yeah, but only to parts per million - dug around a bit and no, that likely won't pick up problematic levels of hormones (or arsenic or lead :tt2:) since the concentration is too low. For most of us this won't matter since we change enough water anyway, so it was a bit of an irrelevant aside.



    Hehe, and I'd bet all of us would rather spend that kind of cash on more aquariums!!
     
  8. BoelderBeestie

    BoelderBeestie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,062
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Yes we don't need such fancy devices, if we do we are breaking the K.I.S.S. rule.:lol:
     
    Nina_W and A new day like this.
  9. Marcel_73

    Marcel_73

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2018
    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    198
    Location:
    Sunninghill, Jhb
    I was recently in a geyser manufacturing plant in Johannesburg .. water only comes into contact with metal in your pipes, so from the geyser to the tap (copper) and that is hot and cold. The inside of a modern geyser is a baked, almost porcelain type paint that prevents the water from ever touching the zinc outer case.

    Personally I'm far more concerned about the chemicals and detritus that flows freely between Jhb water and any cracks in the water works before getting to my house. Check the filter on your taps (bathroom & kitchen) you'll be horrified about the amount of small stones and other crap that collects there
     
    Nina_W and Shabir like this.
  10. BoelderBeestie

    BoelderBeestie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2016
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    1,062
    Location:
    Cape Town
    Yes, what I saw in mine wasn't the geyser itself but detritus that gathered on the bottom of the geyser over the years. It had a layer of yellow/brown sludge a few cm deep on the bottom. The same stuff that accumulates on my sediment filters just much more of it.
     
  11. Marcel_73

    Marcel_73

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2018
    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    198
    Location:
    Sunninghill, Jhb
    yum yum :tt2:
     

Recent Posts

Loading...
Similar Threads - water changes Forum Date
No water changes? Plants do the job... Planted Tanks Sep 3, 2020
Water changes on 500L tank Beginner Discussions Aug 10, 2020
Waterchanges??? General Fish Discussions Mar 29, 2020
Purpose of water changes General Discus discussions Feb 18, 2020
Water changes Community Tanks Jun 18, 2017
Who doesn't use de-chlorine/chloramine for water changes? General Discussions Nov 20, 2016
Water Changes: Straight from the hose? General Discussions Nov 4, 2016

Share This Page